Quaggy Ecology Acrylic on text on canvas, 6" x 6"

Acrylic painting by Leah Palmer Preiss of blue heron with fish in wetlands    My parents live by a pond (with very quaggy edges) & for a while they were regularly visited by a magnificent great blue heron. So when Anu gave me this word, I instantly thought of “Oscar” (as he was named by my grandmother, though I’m not sure why). I doubt Oscar ever landed a fish as large as this, nor could his neck bend in quite such a conveniently Q-like fashion, but he was an intrepid fisherman & a gorgeous creature, so this is my tribute to his majestic beauty. North Carolina (where most of my family lives) is the home of wonderful wetlands. As with many such areas across the country, they are very much in danger from over-development, so I thought of this dilemma often as I was painting this. Let’s hope generations to come will still be able to experience the wonder & awe I felt when Oscar came to visit. 

Acrylic painting in progress by Leah Palmer Preiss, great blue heron head, miniature painting detail

Acrylic painting in progress by Leah Palmer Preiss, miniature fish detail

 

6 thoughts on “Quaggy Ecology Acrylic on text on canvas, 6" x 6"

  1. Nancy Stewart

    I am curious as to whether you are related to the illustrator, Robin Preiss Glasser. I have been reading “Fancy Nancy” books with some fans of that series–first graders in Syracuse, NY. I see that the pictures are “based on the art of Robin Preiss Glasser. The middle name is not that common!

    Reply
    1. Leah Post author

      Not that I know of, Nancy, but I actually have niece named Robin Preiss! It is a fairly unusual name… I always have to correct spelling or pronunciation (it’s pronounced “price”).

      Reply
  2. Michael Hines

    Marvelous rendition! Like you, we here in Tidewater Virginia are standing vigil over the demise of the quaggy delights of old. Our home is in a suburban development in York County next to the Williamsburg/Newport News airport; it was a swamp until “developed” 25 years ago. We still have greenspace, retention ponds and lakes here which offer us the persistent presence of blue heron, osprey, and migratory fowl….but precious little that’s truly quaggy. We take what we can get and try to keep it intact. Thanks for memorializing the blessings of the quagmires, past and present.

    Reply
    1. Leah Post author

      Sadly, it’s the case almost everywhere these days. But I’m glad you are still enjoying the wildlife.

      Reply
  3. Bill Graessle

    Leah: You did it again. I shared with you once upon a time where I live, and the Great Blue Herons are one of my favorites always. Every time I see one fly I wonder how it’s possible, as they look like they are all “arms and legs” but they are so incredibly graceful and beautiful. And your work captures that and adds a dash of playfulness to it. Thank you for being you and going what you do! Bill

    Reply

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